Live Science reports that several restaurants in the United States are serving up a raw chicken dish that’s referred to as either chicken sashimi or chicken tartare, according to Food & Wine Magazine. Though the “specialty” hasn’t caught on much in the U.S., it’s more widely available in Japan. Eating chicken sashimi puts a person at a “pretty high risk” of getting an infection caused by Campylobacter or Salmonella, two types of bacteria that cause food poisoning, said Ben Chapman, a food safety specialist and an associate professor at North Carolina State University.

Campylobacter infections are one of the most common causes of diarrheal infections in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The bacteria cause gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea, cramping and abdominal pain, and in some cases can also cause nausea and vomiting, the CDC says. There are an estimated 1.3 million cases in the U.S. each year and fewer than 100 deaths, on average, each year from the infection.

Salmonella infections also cause symptoms such as diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps, according to the CDC. About 1.2 million people contract Salmonella each year, and about 450 people die from the infection, the CDC says.

Chapman noted that eating raw chicken is different from eating raw fish, which can be found in sushi dishes. With raw fish, the germs that are most likely to make a person sick are parasites, and these parasites can be killed by freezing the fish, he said. Salmonella, on the other hand, “isn’t going to be affected by freezing.”

In Japan, where the dish is more popular, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare advised restaurants in June 2016 to “re-evaluate raw and half-raw chicken menus,” according to The Asahi Shimbun, a Japanese newspaper. The ministry urged restaurants to cook chicken to an internal temperature of 75 degrees Celsius (167 degrees Fahrenheit). The recommendation from the ministry came after more than 800 people said they were sickened several months earlier after eating chicken sashimi and chicken “sushi” rolls, The Asahi Shimbun reported.

The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) has identified an outbreak of Salmonella, impacting at least 14 individuals. As part of the CDPH investigation, Best BBQ at 1648 W. 115th Street has been linked to the outbreak. Following a request from CDPH, Best BBQ closed voluntarily and is fully cooperating with the investigation. At least six individuals have been hospitalized related to the outbreak.
 
CDPH recommends anyone who recently ate at the restaurant in question and is suffering symptoms to see a medical provider and inform them of the possibility of Salmonella.

“This is a serious condition that is treatable,” said CDPH Commissioner Julie Morita, M.D. “Anyone who believes they may be symptomatic and ate at this restaurant should see their medical provider immediately. CDPH is taking every precaution as part of our robust response in order to limit the impact of this outbreak.”
 
Salmonella is a bacteria that can be treated with antibiotics. Most people infected develop diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps between 12 and 72 hours after infection.

Salmonella symptoms usually last four to seven days, and most individuals recover without any treatment. In some cases, diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites. In these cases, Salmonella can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics. The elderly, infants, and those with impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that Salmonella causes approximately one million illnesses and 450 deaths in the United States each year.

The outbreak was detected by CDPH officials’ ongoing surveillance, reviewing laboratory reports of patients diagnosed with specific diseases. Investigators recognized an uptick in a particular laboratory serotype of Salmonella cases and then contacted patients to determine if there were any commonalities between the various cases. This led to the determination that a number of individuals with a single Salmonella serotype recently ate at the restaurant in question. Working with CDPH food protection inspectors, the restaurant is addressing any possible contamination issues, to ensure sanitary and health conditions are in place. They are also providing a list of suppliers to investigate possible concerns with food sources. CDPH has also issued an alert to area physicians of the outbreak, providing medical guidance.

The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.

This outbreak includes four different types of Salmonella: Thompson, Kiambu, Agona, and Gaminara. The same strain of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.

A total of 201 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Thompson (131), Salmonella Kiambu (57), Salmonella Agona (8), or Salmonella Gaminara (5) have been reported from 23 states.

Sixty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

Two additional outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to imported papayas from two other farms in Mexico, Caraveo Produce and El Zapotanito, have been identified. Available information indicates that illnesses in these two outbreaks are not linked to papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm and are being investigated separately.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche, Caraveo Produce, or El Zapotanito farms in Mexico.

Because three separate outbreaks linked to papayas from different farms have been identified, CDC is concerned that papayas from several other farms in Mexico might be contaminated with Salmonella and have made people sick.

Since Friday, August 18, the Arkansas Department of Health has received and is investigating approximately 30 reports of people ill with what is likely a foodborne illness. To date, we have four confirmed cases of Salmonella. At this point, epidemiological information suggests that the Chuck Wagon Restaurant in Stuttgart, Arkansas is the likely site of the outbreak.

Arkansas Department of Health is taking steps to address this outbreak. We are collecting biological specimens from patients that are ill. In addition, we are collecting information about where they have eaten and any other common exposures they might have had. This may include animal or worksite exposure. ADH has inspected the site that has been identified as a common food source for these individuals and identified risks were removed. We have received cooperation from the site and have provided additional food safety training to all employees. Arkansas Department of Health will be conducting a follow-up inspection.

People who ate at the restaurant on or around Aug. 14-16, and are experiencing symptoms should contact their healthcare provider first, and then the Arkansas Department of Health either at 501-537-8969 or by email at adh.foodsafe@arkansas.gov.

The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections. This outbreak includes four different types of Salmonella: Kiambu, Thompson, Agona, and Gaminara. The same strain of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.

A total of 173 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51), Salmonella Thompson (111), Salmonella Agona (7), or Salmonella Gaminara (4) have been reported from 21 states.  Connecticut 6, Delaware 4, Iowa 2, Illinois 3, Kentucky 4, Louisiana 1, Maryland 8, Massachusetts 8, Michigan 1, Minnesota 4, Missouri 1, North Carolina 5, New Jersey 36, New York 50, Ohio 1, Oklahoma 4, Pennsylvania 8, Tennessee 1, Texas 9, Virginia 16, Wisconsin 1.  Fifty-eight ill people have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak. Three brands of Maradol papayas have been recalled: Caribeña brand, distributed by Grande Produce; certain Cavi brand papayas distributed by Agroson’s; and Valery brand papayas, distributed by Freshtex Produce, LLC. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately. The FDA has also added the Carica de Campeche farm to Import Alert (IA) 99-35, after testing found multiple strains of Salmonella present in the fruit. Thus far, Salmonella strains matching the outbreak patterns by PFGE were only isolated from papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

The Packer reports today that the Wisconsin Department of Health Services has linked 11 cases of salmonellosis to the consumption of fresh shelled peas from farmers markets.

A news release Aug. 11 tied seven illnesses to the peas, and another four cases have been confirmed since then.

The seven people initially reported as cases were all infected with the same strain of salmonella, and all of them had eaten fresh shelled peas that were purchased July 22 from farmers markets in Green Bay, Madison and Fond du Lac, according to the release.

Health officials are still working to determine the source of the outbreak.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has recommended that people throw away shelled peas purchased July 19-Aug. 5 at the Dane County Farmers Market in Madison, the Downtown Green Bay Farmers Market, or the Fond du Lac Farmers Market.

Not included in that notice are peas that were sold in their pod or shell or peas purchased at other farmers markets.

As of August 9, 2017, 141 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51) or Salmonella Thompson (90) have been reported from 19 states. Connecticut 5, Delaware 4, Iowa 2, Illinois 2, Kentucky 3, Louisiana 2, Maryland 8, Massachusetts 6, Michigan 1, Minnesota 4, North Carolina 3, New Jersey 27, New York 39, Ohio 1, Oklahoma 4, Pennsylvania 8, Texas 7, Virginia 14, Wisconsin 1, Total 141
Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to July 27, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 39. Among 136 ill people with available information, 83 (61%) are female. Among 98 people with available information, 66 (67%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 103 people with available information, 45 (44%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Illnesses that occurred after July 14, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

Based on information collected to date, CDC is now recommending that consumers not eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico. If consumers aren’t sure if their Maradol papaya came from the Carica de Campeche farm, they should ask the place of purchase. When in doubt, don’t eat it; just throw it out. Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

As was reported in the last update on August 4, FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella bacteria, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. CDC is working to determine if there are any illnesses with these other types of Salmonella linked to this outbreak.

The FDA is advising consumers not to eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico because they are linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis.

Three brands of Maradol papayas have been recalled: Caribeña brand, distributed by Grande Produce; certain Cavi brand papayas distributed by Agroson’s; and Valery brand papayas, distributed by Freshtex Produce, LLC. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately.

Recent Op-ed in the Hill on Import Risks:

http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/energy-environment/343444-why-the-us-imports-tainted-food-that-can-kill-you

The CDC reports today that the outbreak investigation has expanded to include another strain of Salmonella.

Sixty-four more ill people from 15 states were added to this investigation since the last update on July 21, 2017.

Six more states have reported ill people: Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Laboratory tests showed that the strain of Salmonella Thompson isolated from papayas collected in Maryland is closely related genetically to clinical isolates from ill people.

FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and found they were contaminated with several types of Salmonella.

A total of 109 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (48) or Salmonella Thompson (61) have been reported from 16 states – Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Thirty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas imported from Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

At this time, Caribeña brand papayas from Mexico have been identified as one brand linked to the outbreak. On July 26, Grande Produce recalled Caribeña brand Maradol papayas that were distributed between July 10 and July 19, 2017.

Through testing, the FDA has also identified Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche papaya farm in Mexico as a likely source of the outbreak. The agency is working to identify other brands of papayas that may have originated from Carica de Campeche and facilitate recalls.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from Mexico.

Elkhorn Logan Valley Public Health Department and Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services continue to investigate an outbreak of salmonella in West Point. To date, there have been 20 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases. ELVPHD and DHHS are working to identify the source of the outbreak and make sure the risk is eliminated.

Local health department officials and DHHS are conducting interviews with Nebraskans who contracted the illness. So far, all confirmed cases have one common factor which is dining at Red Door Coffee in West Point. Red Door Coffee owners and staff are fully cooperating with the investigation.

Anyone who ate at Red Door Coffee July 14 – July 29 is asked to complete a brief survey that will help ELVPHD and DHHS in this investigation. The survey may be found at:  https://han.ne.gov/survey/rdc.

Salmonella is caused by a bacteria that lives in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals. It is usually spread to humans by eating contaminated food, including beef, poultry, milk, eggs, fruits or vegetables.

Symptoms of salmonella include fever, diarrhea and stomach cramps. The illness usually lasts 4-7 days. Most people recover without treatment. However, in some cases the diarrhea may be so severe that a person needs to be hospitalized. People at highest risk for salmonella infection include: children under 5 years old, older adults and people with weakened immune systems. Anyone experiencing symptoms consistent with salmonella should contact their doctor for recommendations on testing and treatment.

Seattle-King County Public Health Friday announced it is investigating a salmonellosis outbreak caused by Salmonella Stanley, an uncommon strain of Salmonella bacteria.

Six persons infected with Salmonella Stanley were reported to Public Health during July 17–July 24.

On July 26-27, genetic fingerprinting results for four of the six cases became available, and all had the same genetic fingerprint, suggesting that they have some common source of infection; genetic fingerprinting for the other two cases is pending.

This fingerprint has only been seen twice before in King County where two to six cases of Salmonella Stanley have been reported annually over the past several years. Public Health is attempting to interview each case to gather information about possible risk factors for infection.

The source of the outbreak is still under investigation.

The median age of the cases is 21 years; three cases are female and three are male. None of the cases are known to have been hospitalized. Additional details on the investigation will be posted as they are available.

Salmonellosis is a bacterial infection that is often spread through the fecal-oral route, through contaminated food and water, or through contact with animals and their environments. Symptoms of salmonellosis include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, fever, chills, and abdominal cramping. Illness typically lasts several days and people can spread infection to others even after symptoms resolve.

To prevent Salmonella infection:

  • Wash hands with soap and water after going to the bathroom, changing diapers, touching animals, and before eating or preparing food.
  • Cook all meats thoroughly, especially poultry.
  • Wash cutting boards and counters used for meat or poultry preparation immediately after use to avoid cross contaminating other foods.

Here is an interesting research article on the likely source of the outbreak.

Characterization of Isolates of Salmonella enterica Serovar Stanley, a Serovar Endemic to Asia and Associated with Travel

Rene S. Hendriksen,a Simon Le Hello,b Valeria Bortolaia,a Chaiwat Pulsrikarn,d Eva Møller Nielsen,c Srirat Pornruangmong,d Phattharaporn Chaichana,d Christina Aaby Svendsen,a François-Xavier Weill,b and Frank M. Aarestrupa J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Mar; 50(3): 709–720. doi:  10.1128/JCM.05943-11 This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Go to: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3295172/

Abstract

Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley (S. Stanley) is a common serovar in Southeast Asia and was the second most common serovar implicated in human salmonellosis in Thailand in the years 2002 to 2007. In contrast, this serovar is relatively uncommon in Europe. The objective of this study was to characterize a collection of S. Stanley strains isolated from Thai (n = 62), Danish (n = 39), and French (n = 24) patients to gain a broader understanding of the genetic diversity, population dynamics, and susceptibility to antimicrobials. All isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The molecular mechanisms of resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and plasmid-mediated resistance to quinolones were characterized by PCR and sequencing. Plasmid profiling, replicon typing, and microarray analysis were used to characterize the genetic mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in 10 extended-spectrum cephalosporinase-producing isolates. Considerable
genetic diversity was observed among the isolates characterized with 91 unique XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, including 17 distinct clusters consisting of two to seven indistinguishable isolates. We found some of the S. Stanley isolates isolated from patients in Europe were acquired during travel to Southeast Asia, including Thailand. The presence of multiple plasmid lineages carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporinase-encoding blaCMY-2 gene in S. Stanley isolates from the central part of Thailand was confirmed. Our results emphasize that Thai authorities, as well as authorities in other countries lacking prudent use of antimicrobials, should improve the ongoing efforts to regulate antimicrobial use in agriculture and in clinical settings to limit the spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates and plasmids among humans and pigs in Thailand and abroad.