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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation

Kudos to Taco John’s

Early this morning on E. coli Blog I posted a call to Taco John’s to pay the E. coli victim’s medical bills.

“William Marler, a food safety advocate and attorney who is representing 10 victims of an E. coli outbreak at several Taco John’s locations in Iowa and Minnesota, called today on Taco John’s to pay the medical bills of all individuals who became ill with E. coli infections as part of the outbreak. “We know that at least 26 people were hospitalized during this outbreak,” Marler said. “Some families are already facing bills in the tens of thousands of dollars. It’s only right that Taco John’s should step up and pay all victims’ medical bills.”

“Marler noted that in other outbreak-situations companies such as Dole, Jack in the Box, Odwalla, Chi-Chi’s and Sheetz advanced medical costs for outbreak victims whose illnesses were traced to their food products. “Other companies have shown their commitment to corporate responsibility and have put their customers first. It is my hope that Taco John’s will follow their lead,” Marler concluded.”

It is good to see that someone other than my mother reads my blogs.  A few moments ago, Taco John’s announced that they would pay the medical bills.  Great job Taco John’s!

However, past medical bills are a part of the compensation that victims can rightly recover.  Wage Loss, Future Medical Expenses and Pain and Suffering are also recoverable.  Today, we filed the second lawsuit against Taco John’s on behalf of another Iowa resident.

Taco John’s CEO aims to blunt damage from E. coli outbreak
Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS – Taco John’s International sought Tuesday to reassure customers that an E. coli outbreak at its Mexican restaurants in Minnesota and Iowa was isolated and now behind the company.  “We’d like to hope that people would feel confident to come back to Taco John’s this afternoon for lunch,” CEO Paul Fisherkeller said at a morning news conference in Minneapolis where he said he’d do that himself.  Fisherkeller said the company would cover the medical costs of all its customers who got sick. At least 80 people in the two states were sickened after eating at restaurants in three cities.

OK, Taco Bell, what are you doing about your customer’s medical bills?  See my post from December 5, 2006.