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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation

FDA Update on Peanut Butter Recall

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention said in a statement March 7 that 425 people in 44 states were infected with the strain of salmonella also found in the peanut products and 71 people had been hospitalized. Two-thirds of the cases began after Dec. 1, 2006.

The FDA announced that the recall has now been extended back to October 2004.

As a follow-up to the recent Salmonella outbreak linked to peanut butter, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing consumers that ConAgra has extended their recall of all Peter Pan peanut butter, and all Great Value peanut butter beginning with product code 2111, including peanut butter toppings, back to October 2004. This information was obtained recently as part of the ongoing investigation being conducted by FDA.

Consumers who have purchased any of the products since October 2004 should discard them. FDA’s advice to consumers continues to be not to eat any Peter Pan peanut butter or any Great Value peanut butter beginning with the 2111 product code.

FDA will provide updates on recalled products, including any other products that may have been made with potentially contaminated peanut butter and distributed to consumers.

Symptoms of foodborne illness caused by Salmonella include fever, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. In persons with poor underlying health or weakened immune systems, Salmonella can invade the bloodstream and cause life-threatening infections or death. Individuals who have recently eaten peanut butter-containing products from these companies and who have experienced any of these symptoms should contact their doctor or health care provider immediately and report the illnesses to their state or local health authorities. Similarly, institutional food establishments and other food service providers who have received reports of illness from consumers after they consumed a product containing this peanut butter are encouraged to share that information with their local health department.

FDA is continuing to work closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and with states and local officials to identify how the contamination occurred in order to prevent similar foodborne illness outbreaks.