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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation

Family hit hard by E. coli bacteria

Scott Harvey of WAVE reported on the tragic condition of our client and her son as they both struggle to survive the aftermath of the E. coli outbreak that still has yet to be solved.

Mother fears daughter may never fully recover from bout with E. coli

A Floyd County woman watched her son battle a deadly strain of E. coli back in September. Now she’s hospitalized with the same illness. But her health isn’t the only problem the single mother of five is facing. It was 52 days ago — on September 30th — when Amelia Seraiah came down with the deadly bacteria. Her children are now staying with family members, who say they just pray she makes a full recovery.

Sharon Peltier has a lot to be thankful for this week. Her 3-year-old grandson, William, is off dialysis and doing better. He spent 17 days last month in Kosair Children’s Hospital. Now Peltier’s daughter (William’s mother) is in Norton Hospital, fighting the same illness: E. coli.  "She got a blood infection," said Peltier. "She was bleeding from her nails, her lips, and her scalp."

Amelia Seraiah, 39, also has four daughters. Two are students at Galen Elementary. You might remember that an outbreak of E. coli hit the southern Indiana school in September. Amelia’s daughters didn’t get sick, but William did. Shortly after, Amelia did too.

"They said this was all part of the E. coli, Peltier said. "Then, one by one, all of her organs started shutting down."

Peltier says she has never seen anyone suffer like her daughter has over the last 50 days. At one point, Amelia was placed on a ventilator and drifted into a coma-like state.  "She was constantly in pain," Peltier said. "When she would open her eyes, there was this fear of not knowing what was going on."

Amelia has something else to worry about. Last week, she got a letter from her employer telling her she no longer had a job. We contacted the company, HR Affiliates, but no one would comment on her termination. Because she had worked there less than a year, she doesn’t qualify for long-term disability.

Now, with no job and no health insurance, Amelia can’t afford to pay her rent. Three of her daughters have moved in with their dad, and her son is living with his grandmother. Through it all, Sharon Peltier held onto her faith and trusted the doctors to do what was best for her daughter.

"Every step of the way, I told them do whatever you have to do," said Peltier. "but looking back I now it was just god. It was his amazing grace that helped her, because I don’t think a human being could go through that."  Amelia Seraiah is still far from a full recovery. Her mother told us doctors found a blood clot in one of her lungs and she will have to undergo months of rehab. Friends have set up a donation fund for the family at the National City Bank in Floyds Knobs.

Single mom from Floyd County still hospitalized with E. coli

  • I just the article on WAVE last night. When I read the story, I assumed it was another Topps meat case.
    So tragic. I feel terrible for your client and her family. I hope she recovers and that you’re able to trace a source to the E. coli.

  • Rick Lovan

    I worked for the Southern Indiana Chamber of which Amelia was an integral member. She was always available to help with Ribbon Cuttings and other Ambassador functions. Some of the members of One Southern Indiana would like to wish her well but are unable to locate her. If you have an address where we can send her a card please advise. Thank You.
    Rick Lovan
    AtEaseIDs@insightbb.com