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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation

Burch Equipment Expands Listeria Recall from Cantaloupe to Honeydew

There have been no illnesses reported to date.

Burch Equipment LLC, North Carolina, is expanding its recall to include all of this growing season’s cantaloupes and honeydew melons that may remain on the market because they may possibly be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

honeydew.jpgThe whole cantaloupes are identified by a red label reading Burch Farms referencing PLU # 4319. All cantaloupes involved in the recall were grown by Burch Farms, however some of the cantaloupes may have been identified with a “Cottle Strawberry, Inc.” sticker referencing PLU #4319. Cantaloupes from Burch Farms were shipped in both corrugated boxes (9 cantaloupe per case) and in bulk bins.

Honeydew melons involved in this recall expansion do not bear any identifying stickers and were packed in cartons labeled melons.

The cantaloupes and honeydew melons involved in this expanded recall were sold to distributors between June 23rd and July 27th, in the following states: FL, GA, IL, KY, MA, MD, ME, MI, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, SC, and VA, VT and WV. The melons may have further been distributed to retail stores, restaurants and food service facilities in other states.

FDA and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services are working with Burch Equipment LLC following a random sample of a cantaloupe testing positive for Listeria monocytogenes.

This recall expansion is based on FDA’s finding of Listeria monocytogenes on a honeydew melon grown and packed by Burch.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. The incubation period (the length of time between consuming a product and becoming ill) for Listeria monocytogenes can be 1 to 3 weeks, but may be in the range of 3 to 70 days.