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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation

Raw Milk, Irradiation, Grain or Grass-fed Meat and Food Safety

In the "blog-o-sphere" a lot of heat, but not much light is generated in the "foodie space" talking passionately about these issues.  Here are several articles that have been posted on Marler Blog over the last year.  I hope they are helpful in a lighter debate.

Grass-Fed vs Grain-Fed Beef and the Holy Grail: A Literature Review

Pros and Cons of Commercial Irradiation of Fresh Iceberg Lettuce and Fresh Spinach: A Literature Review

Raw Milk Cons: Review of the Peer-Reviewed Literature

Raw Milk Pros: Review of the Peer-Reviewed Literature

  • Thought I’d summarize for foodies, since usually the only math-tech reading we do involves measuring spoons and cups:
    Grass Fed: Jury is still out, & grass fed beef is not necessarily better nutritionally, food safety wise, or taste wise. It’s nice that ruminants can live like ruminants, though, and supporting the kind of small farms that grass pasture their animals makes Foodies feel swell.
    Raw milk: Unsafe, unless you live with Fairies who will sprinkle magic powder on you as you drink or eat unpasteurized cheese. You might want to ask the Fairies for a pot of gold, too.
    Irradiated spinach and lettuce: Jury is still out about whether the free radicals created during the irradiation process are harmful to ingest, and about whether irradiation actually works to kill foodborne pathogens. For many foodies the biggest issue is the LABELING. IF we’re going to glow in the dark, we’d like to be aware of this. Because y’know, then we can apply to be the fifth member of the Fantastic Four. Labeling requirements for irradiated greens doesn’t apply when said greens are turned into a nice salad or tossed onto a nice sandwich you purchase at your local gourmet joint.

  • Terri

    If you read the irradiation pieces and look at the references, it is clear that the jury is NOT still out on irradiation safety and efficacy as a processing method for fresh lettuce and spinach. It is a safe and effective method to reduce pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7 in combination with good agricultural practices and HACCP. Use of food irradiation would prevent illnesses and deaths, and the technology should not be discounted based on false or non-science based statements.

  • ERISHA BROWN

    I BOUGHT BABY FOOD AND FOUND A BUG IN IT , WHAT ARE MY LEGAL RIGHTS?
    DO I NEED TO SEND TO A LAB ?
    I ALREADY CALLED GERBER AND THEY SAID THEY WERE SENDING A PACKAGE FOR ME TO RETURN THE TAINTED PRODUCT TO THEM , I HAVENT RECEIVED ANYTHING AS YET. I JUST WANT TO KNOW WHAT TO DO NEXT