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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation

Emily Grabowski, a student from Irondequoit, New York and the New York Times join in the non-E. coli O157:H7 Discussion

William Neuman’s article “In E. Coli Fight, Some Strains Are Largely Ignored,” went live a few moments ago. It will be interesting to see if this prompts a serious reassessment by our government of the real risks of non-O157:H7’s.  Although Mr. Neuman’s article will be read by a few more millions of people than our petition to the USDA to deem the “big six” as adulterants, I think the petition is a good read – "Petition with the USDA/FSIS for an interpretive rule declaring all enterohemorrhagic Shiga toxin-producing serotypes of Escherichia coli (E. coli), including non-O157 serotypes, to be adulterants."  However, if you want a bit of a quicker overview for why these bugs should be adulterants, please see, "It is well past time for the USDA to declare that all shiga-toxin producing strains of E. coli are adulterants and ban them from our food supply."

Let the discussion begin.  For goodness sake, I spent $500,000 on the tests.

  • Ken

    I took the Seafood HACCP course recently hoping to make myself more marketable since some of my previous training did not come with a HACCP Alliance Certificate.
    The official manual states that bones in fish are naturally occuring and therefor not an adulterant.They do not need to be addressed in the HACCP plan.