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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation


Cambrooke Foods® is announcing a voluntary recall of all batches of the following products:

Cheddar Wizard Low Protein Imitation Cream Cheese (SKU 10310; 8 oz. jar);
Herb & Garlic Low Protein Imitation Cream Cheese (SKU 10308; 8 oz. jar); and
Plain Low Protein Imitation Cream Cheese (SKU 10306; 8 oz. jar).

Cambrooke Foods® is undertaking this voluntary recall as a precaution because some of these products may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

For the above-listed Imitation Cream Cheese products, Listeria monocytogenes was detected through routine batch testing of product at a company facility before it was sent to customers. These batches of Imitation Cream Cheese products were destroyed. While no reports of adverse events have been reported with any product shipped to our customers, we are taking the precautionary step to recall all Imitation Cream Cheese products, regardless of batch number.

To be abundantly cautious and proactive, Cambrooke Foods® is also conducting a market withdrawal of all batches of:

Low Protein Peanot Butter™ (SKU 10809; 16 oz. jar).

This product is being withdrawn because it is produced in the same facility and using the same machinery used to produce the Imitation Cream Cheese products. Testing has not confirmed Listeria contamination in any batch of Low Protein Peanot Butter™ nor have any adverse events been reported as a result of its consumption. No other Cambrooke Foods™ product is produced using this machinery.

  • This is especially urgent, as Cambrooke produces specialty diets for children and adults who suffer from genetic deficiencies in protein digestion – phenylketonuria and other similar diseases.
    The company sells its product directly, over the internet, and also through some specialty shops. One such shop, for example, is based on the premises of Toronto’s internationally recognized Hospital for Sick Children.
    I am very bothered by the slow response of FDA. I received this alert from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency late on Friday, December 12. FDA’s “urgent” recall announcement is dated December 12, but only reached my email inbox on December 14th.
    What gives?