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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation

Guillain-Barr√© syndrome (GBS) and Reactive Arthritis (Reiter’s Syndrome) Sites Updated

Reactive Arthritis refers to a group of arthritic diseases that includes a subset formally know as “Reiter’s Syndrome” The old term Reiter’s syndrome has fallen into disfavor. In recent medical literature Reiter’s Syndrome is simply referred to as Reactive Arthritis which may or may not be accompanied by extraintestinal manifestations. Reactive Arthritis is the name used to describe an uncommon, but potentially debilitating group of symptoms that follows a gastrointestinal, genitourinary, or viral infection. The most common gastrointestinal bacteria involved are Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, Shigella, E. coli, and Vibrio. The most common genitourinary causes are sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia and Gonorrhea. The most common viral causes are the common flu, HIV, and Parvovirus.  Click on image to visit:

Guillain-Barré (ghee-yan bah-ray) syndrome (GBS) is a disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks part of the peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system includes the cranial nerves (except the optic [eye] nerve), the spinal nerves, and the autonomic nervous system that governs involuntary actions. The central nervous system is the spinal cord and brain. GBS often occurs a few days or weeks after a person has had symptoms of a respiratory or gastrointestinal viral or bacterial infection; in fact, two-thirds of affected individuals have had a preceding infection. Campylobacter jejuni, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae are commonly identified antecedent pathogens, although C. jejuni is the most common pathogen that elicits GBS. Occasionally surgery or vaccinations will trigger the syndrome. GBS is not contagious. It has been reported that GBS occurs more in men than in women and more often in the elderly. Seasonality has not been reported in developed countries like the United States.  Click on image to visit: