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Marler Blog Providing Commentary on Food Poisoning Outbreaks & Litigation

FSIS Steps In to Lower Salmonella and Campylobacter Bacteria in Chickens and Turkeys

revised FSIS logo.jpgThe Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) published a Federal Register Notice on May 14, 2010 (75 FR 27288) in which it announced the forthcoming implementation of new performance standards for the pathogenic micro-organisms Salmonella and Campylobacter for chilled carcasses in young chicken (broiler) and turkey slaughter establishments. The new performance standards were developed in response to a charge from the President’s Food Safety Working Group and based on recent FSIS Nationwide Microbiological Baseline Data Collection Programs. The standards will be applied to sample sets collected and analyzed by the Agency to evaluate establishment performance with respect to requirements of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) Rule.

Trying to cut the risk of foodborne illnesses caused by contaminated raw poultry, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced stricter standards to reduce Salmonella and Campylobacter in young chickens and turkey.

“These improved standards will drive the industry to do better,” Under Secretary for Food Safety Dr. Elisabeth Hagen said in the statement. “They are tough but achievable. And when fully implemented, they will prevent tens of thousands of Americans from getting sick.”

  • Bill Anderson

    Life-Saving in the Bacterial World: How Campylobacter Rely on Pseudomonas to Infect Humans

  • doc raymond

    Unfortunately, FSIS has no authority to enforce the standards. The Supreme Beef case decided that they could not pull inspectors even if an establishment failed multiple, consecutive Salmonella sets, displaying total disregard for the standards.