According to local press reports, Westchester County has treated 250 people who may have been exposed to hepatitis A at Sleepy Hollow Country Club, officials said today.

Those people received preventive treatment after a club employee was infected by one of the five people who were exposed to hepatitis A at bartaco in Port Chester, said Caren Halbfinger, a spokeswoman for the Westchester Department of Health.

The department is offering free treatment at its clinic at 134 Court St. in White Plains for anyone who ate or drank at the club between Oct. 30 and Nov. 4.

The Health Department will offer hepatitis A vaccine to most people. Infants under 1 year old and people with immune-compromising conditions will be given immune globulin.

The county clinic is providing treatment from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Tuesday, 9 to 11 a.m. on Wednesday and Thursday, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday. Officials said treatment is most effective within two weeks of exposure.

Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow is offering treatment for anyone who attended its gala at the country club on Nov. 3. Treatment is available at the hospital at 755 N. Broadway from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday this week.

Anyone who ate or drank at the club between Oct. 21 and Oct. 29 may also have been exposed, but the treatment is only effective within two weeks of exposure, officials said. Anyone who is too late for treatment is still urged to contact their health care provider immediately, though, so that anyone they may have exposed can receive treatment.

Health officials said they did not expect this outbreak to affect as many as people as bartaco’s outbreak, which included treatment of more than 3,000 people who were potentially exposed to hepatitis A.

Not  to be confused with the Seven Deadly Sins: pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath and sloth, although, perhaps some of these outbreaks were sinful.  I had the honor to represent many of the ill and the families of those who died.

Jack-in-the- Box E. coli Outbreak – 1992 – 1993

708 ill, 171 hospitalized and 4 dead

An outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 was linked to the consumption of hamburgers from the Jack-in-the-Box Restaurant chain. Cases were reported from the states of Washington (602 cases/144 hospitalizations/3 deaths), Idaho (14 cases/4 hospitalizations/no deaths), California (34 cases/14 hospitalizations/1 death), and Nevada (58 cases/9 hospitalizations/no deaths). A case control study implicated the chain’s hamburgers resulting in a multistate recall of the remaining hamburgers. Only 20 percent of the product remained at the time of the recall; this amounted to 272,672 hamburger patties. Subsequent testing of the hamburger patties showed the presence of E. coli O157:H7. The strain of E. coli O157:H7 found in ill people matched the strain isolated from uncooked hamburger patties. The outbreak illustrated the potential for large, foodborne illness outbreaks associated with restaurant chains receiving shipments of contaminated food. At the time, many clinical laboratories in the United States were not routinely culturing patients’ stool for E. coli O157:H7 by using the correct culture medium. Additionally, many local and state health departments were not actively tracking and investigating E. coli O157:H7 cases.


Chi Chi’s Green Onion Hepatitis A Outbreak – 2003

565 ill, 130 hospitalized and 3 dead

Pennsylvania State health officials first learned of a hepatitis A outbreak when unusually high numbers of hepatitis A cases were reported in late October 2003. All but one of the initial cases had eaten at the Chi Chi’s restaurant at the Beaver Valley Mall, in Monaca, PA. Ultimately, at least 565 cases were confirmed. The victims included at least 13 employees of the Chi Chi’s restaurant, and residents of six other states. Three people died as a consequence of their hepatitis A illnesses. More than 9,000 people who had eaten at the restaurant, or who had been exposed to ill people, were given a post-exposure injection as a prevention against developing hepatitis A. Preliminary analysis of a case-control study indicated fresh, green onions were the probable source of this outbreak. The investigation and tracebacks by the state health department, the CDC, and the FDA, confirmed that the green onions had been grown in Mexico.


Dole Baby Spinach E. coli Outbreak – 2006

238 ill, 103 hospitalized and 5 dead

On Sept. 13, 2006, public health officials in Wisconsin, Oregon and New Mexico noted E. coli O157:H7 infections with matching pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. These illnesses were associated with eating fresh, bagged spinach produced by Dole Brand Natural Selection Foods. By Sept. 26 that year, infections involving the same strain of E. coli O157:H7 had been reported from 26 states with one case in Canada. A voluntary recall was issued by the company on Sept. 15. E. coli O157: H7 was isolated from 13 packages of spinach supplied by patients in 10 states. Eleven of the packages had lot codes consistent with a single manufacturing facility on a particular day. The PFGE pattern of all tested packages matched the PFGE pattern of the outbreak strain. The spinach had been grown in three California counties – Monterey, San Benito and Santa Clara. E. coli O157:H7 was found in environmental samples collected near each of the four fields that provided spinach for the product, as designated by the lot code. However, E. coli O157:H7 isolates associated with only one of the four fields, located on the Paicines Ranch in San Benito County, had a PFGE pattern indistinguishable from the outbreak strain. The PFGE pattern was identified in river water, cattle feces and wild pig feces on the Paicines Ranch, the closest of which was less than one mile from the spinach field.


Peanut Corporation of America Salmonella Outbreak – 2008 – 2009

714 ill, 171 hospitalized and 9 dead

Beginning in November 2008, CDC’s PulseNet staff noted a small and highly dispersed, multistate cluster of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates. The outbreak consisted of two pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) defined clusters of illness. Illnesses continued to be revealed through April 2009, when the last CDC report on the outbreak was published. Peanut butter and products containing peanut butted produced at the Peanut Corporation of America plant in Blakely, GA, were implicated. King Nut brand peanut butter was sold to institutional settings. Peanut paste was sold to many food companies for use as an ingredient. Implicated peanut products were sold widely throughout the USA, 23 countries and non-U.S. territories. Criminal sanctions were brought against the owners of PCA.


Jensen Farms Cantaloupe Listeria Outbreak – 2011

147 ill, 143 hospitalized and 33 dead

A multistate outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes involving five distinct strains was associated with consumption of cantaloupe grown at Jensen Farms’ production fields near Granada, CO. A total of 147 ill people were reported to the CDC. Thirty-three people died, and one pregnant woman miscarried. Seven of the illnesses were related to pregnancy – three newborns and four pregnant women. Among 145 ill people with available information, 143 – 99 percent – were hospitalized. Source tracing of the cantaloupes indicated that they came from Jensen Farms, and were marketed as being from the Rocky Ford region. The cantaloupes were shipped from July 29 through Sept. 10, 2011, to at least 24 states, and possibly distributed elsewhere. Laboratory testing by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment identified Listeria monocytogenes bacteria on cantaloupes collected from grocery stores and from ill persons’ homes. Laboratory testing by FDA identified Listeria monocytogenes matching outbreak strains in samples from equipment and cantaloupe at the Jensen Farms’ packing facility in Granada, Colorado.  Criminal sanctions were brought against the two owners of Jensen Farms.


Bidart Caramel Apple Listeria Outbreak

35 ill, 34 hospitalized and 7 deaths

On December 19, 2014, the CDC announced a multistate outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes linked to commercially produced, prepackaged caramel apples. A total of 35 people infected with the outbreak strains of Listeria monocytogenes were reported from 12 states. Of these, 34 were hospitalized. Listeriosis contributed to at least 3 of the 7 deaths reported. Eleven illnesses were pregnancy-related with one illness resulting in a fetal loss. here invasive illnesses were among otherwise healthy children aged 5-15 years. Twenty-eight (905) of the 31 ill persons interviewed reported eating commercially produced, prepackaged caramel apples before becoming ill. The Public Health Agency of Canada identified one case of listeriosis that was genetically related to the US outbreak. The investigation was assigned Cluster ID #1411MNGX6-1. On December 24, 2014, Happy Apples issued a voluntary recall of Happy Apple brand caramel apples with best use by date between August 25th and November 23rd, 2014 due to a connection between the apples and outbreak associated cases. California Snack Foods brand caramel apples issued a similar recall on December 27th. Both companies used apples supplied by Bidart Brothers. On December 29 Merb’s Candies recalled Bionic Apples and Double Dipped Apples. On January 6, 2105 Bidart Bros. of Bakersfield, California recalled Granny Smith and Gala apples because environmental testing revealed contamination with Listeria monocytogenes at the firm’s apple-packing facility. On January 8, 2015 FDA laboratory analyses using PFGE showed that environmental Listeria isolates from the Bidart Bros. facility were indistinguishable from the outbreak strains.


Andrew and Williamson Cucumber Salmonella Outbreak – 2015

907 ill, 204 hospitalized and 6 dead

On September 4, 2015 the CDC announced an outbreak of Salmonella Poona linked to consumption of cucumbers grown in Mexico and imported by Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce. On March 18, 2016 the outbreak was declared to be over. A total of 907 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Poona were reported from 40 states. Among people for whom information was available, illnesses started on dates ranging from July 3, 2015 to February 29, 2016. Two hundred four ill people were hospitalized and six deaths were reported. Salmonella infection was not considered to be a contributing factor in two of the 6 deaths. Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback investigations identified imported cucumbers from Mexico and distributed by Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce as the likely source of the infections in this outbreak.

According to health reports, about 180 people reported becoming ill after the event and around half of those sought medical care, with 20 percent receiving emergency room care — 10 percent were hospitalized for one or more nights after eating chowder from the Crab Shack at the Chincoteague Chili Chowder Cook Off in late September.

However, Dr. David Matson made it clear Thursday that is was more important to suck up to the place that sickened 180 people with Salmonella.

“The risk is gone,” said the Eastern Shore Health District director. Matson traveled from the health department in Accomac about 45 minutes north to Chincoteague on Thursday to eat lunch. It was more than a mere lunch. The meal at the Crab Shack on Maddox Boulevard was Matson’s statement to the public — an endorsement, if you will —  that the restaurant’s award-winning clam chowder is safe.

It was also tasty — a lightly creamy, savory broth chock full of clams, along with potatoes, celery and carrots, with a hint of bacon, he said.

The health department on Monday identified the site as the source of a salmonella outbreak that occurred after the Chincoteague Chili Chowder Cook Off in late September. The establishment was identified in a news release Tuesday from the health district because there were additional ones also serving chowder at the event.

Health officials say about 150 people living in eight states have been sickened by Salmonella after attending a chili cook-off in Virginia.

Dr. David Matson, director of the state’s Eastern Shore Health District, said by phone Wednesday that half of them have sought medical treatment. Some have been hospitalized.

More than 2,000 people attended the 18th Annual Chincoteague Chili Chowder Cook-Off and Car Show on Sept. 30.

Matson said most people sickened by the bacteria have already become ill with diarrhea, vomiting and fever.

Officials are asking cook-off attendees to fill out a survey as they determine the bacteria’s source.

The 150 people who’ve gotten sick live in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and North Carolina.

After sickening over 30 with E. coli O157:H7 – several kids with acute kidney failure – you would think that all this tainted product would be off the market – but no.  So, FDA, companies, what are you doing?

I just received this from a hero:

“Well because you asked – I just checked Shop.com and now I am truly pissed off.

I ordered a 6-pack of chocolate from Shop.com several weeks ago (and received it) and notified authorities.  The only flavor available then was chocolate.  Now chunky, original, honey, unsweetened – all 6 varieties including original. And 3 varieties of granola. Damm. (attached one of many screenshots I took).

I have just notified OCI again (minutes ago and they have responded) as well as FDA.

I told OCI I wouldn’t order anything more.”

https://www.shop.com/search/soynut+butter

And there is more:

“Not the only place you can get it; I didn’t try to order it, but you can also get IM Healthy Soy Nut Butter (in theory anyway) from an internet marketing place out of Milpitas, California:”

https://www.mercadomagico.com/grocery/cooking-and-baking/im-healthy-unsweetened-creamy-soynut-butter-15-oz/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIvOmKmrrs1gIVFJF-Ch3dLQdsEAkYAiABEgJARfD_BwE

When you still can buy recalled product, that sickened dozens and nearly killed children, at Lucky’s Market on 200 Woodside Rd, Redwood City, CA 94061

Legal note:  It is against federal law for anyone to sell or resell recalled products in any setting, including yard sales and thrift shops.

Of course, this follows on Food Safety News reporting on September 5: “Earlier today, Amazon.com was still selling I.M. Healthy soy nut butter that was recalled in March when federal officials traced an E. coli outbreak to the product.”

And, for anyone who forgot the outbreak , the CDC reported on May 4, 2017, that thirty-two people infected with the outbreak strains of STEC O157:H7 were reported from 12 states. Arizona 4, California 5, Florida 2, Illinois 1, Massachusetts 1, Maryland 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 1, Oregon 11, Virginia 2, Washington 2 and Wisconsin 1. Twelve people were hospitalized. Nine people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome. Twenty-six (81%) of the 32 ill people in this outbreak were younger than 18 years.

Epidemiological, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter was the likely source of this outbreak. Several soy nut products were recalled:

On March 7, 2017, The SoyNut Butter Company recalled all varieties of I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butters and all varieties of I.M. Healthy Granola products. On March 10, 2017, The SoyNut Butter Company expanded its recall to include Dixie Diner’s Club brand Carb Not Beanit Butter.

On March 28, 2017, the FDA issued a Suspension of Food Facility Registration Order to Dixie Dew of Erlanger, Ky., after an inspection revealed insanitary conditions at the firm that could affect the safety of finished products. Dixie Dew is the contract manufacturer for SoyNut Butter Company’s soy nut butter products. The close out of the outbreak investigation does not affect the suspension order.

Dear readers, anyone else find this product for sale at grocery stores, online or other wise?

So, anyone else up at I.M. Healthy, FDA or the US Attorney’s office?

The CDPH Food and Drug Branch (FDB) and Sacramento County Environmental Management Department (SCEMD) recently investigated an outbreak of botulism linked to the consumption of ready to eat nacho cheese purchased at Valley Oak Food and Fuel in Walnut Grove, California. The nacho cheese was applied to chips by customers from a counter-top, self-service warming and dispensing unit supplied by the cheese manufacturer. These types of warming and dispensing units are typically designed to maintain the cheese at approximately 140 deg. F.

As of May 31, 2017, a total of 10 case-patients were laboratory-confirmed with C. botulinum toxin type A. All patients were hospitalized; nine were in an intensive care unit, seven required ventilator support, and one died. Leftover nacho cheese sauce collected from the gas station yielded C. botulinum toxin type A bacteria and toxin. Due to the extensive distribution of the same lot code of nacho cheese throughout the United States without additional botulism cases, internal testing conducted by the Wisconsin manufacturer of the nacho cheese, and only a single bag of cheese linked to human illness, FDB and SCEMD suspect the nacho cheese was likely contaminated at the retail location. A few items in particular were noted during the investigation that was concerning:

The 5 pound bag of nacho cheese collected at the retail location on May 5, 2017 was being used past the “Best By” date.

Records were not being maintained by the gas station employees indicating when the bag of nacho cheese was originally added to the warming unit.

The plastic tool designed to open the bags of cheese (provided with the nacho cheese warming and dispensing unit) was not being used by employees. 
FDB is aware that these types of nacho cheese warming and dispensing units are in use at many retail locations throughout California. These units generally provide safe, ready-to-eat foods without significant input from employees at each location. FDB would like to provide the following guidance regarding the use of nacho cheese warming and dispensing units in retail locations.

1.  Management and employees should follow the instructions for each type of machine and product they use. Instructions for use may be included on the packaging of the 
bagged nacho cheese or included on the interior panels of the warming and dispensing unit. These directions may include pre-heating and the length of time a product can remain at elevated holding temperatures. In some cases the product may only be held above 135 deg. F. for 4-6 days.

2.  Management should ensure that records are maintained indicating when bagged cheese was last changed. This may be accomplished by writing the date the product was added to the warmer on the bag itself.

3.  Management should ensure that the warming and dispensing units are not turned off at night or plugged into a timer. These types of machines need to remain “on” at all times. This will ensure that appropriate temperatures are maintained in this ready-to- eat food.

4.  Management and employees should ensure that any supplied tools for opening the bags of cheese are used per the product directions. These devices need to be washed, rinsed, and sanitized between uses. In some cases these opening tools are only supplied with warming and dispensing unit.

5.  Management and employees should verify on a regular basis that the internal temperature of the hot held cheese product is being held at the proper temperature. The internal temperature can be measured by placing the cheese product in a cup with a thermometer to verify the product is maintaining the minimum hot holding temperature of 135 deg. F as required under the California Retail Food Code Section 113996 or hot holding temperature as recommended by the manufacturer.

CDPH hopes this information can be shared widely to ensure retail food facilities have current information and are taking appropriate measures to keep our food supply safe. Thank you for your consideration and ongoing collaboration with our Department.

In March 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and several state health departments attributed a multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 to I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter manufactured by Dixie Dew and sold at retail on online outlets.[1]

Outbreak investigators collected open containers of SoyNut Butter from the homes of sick people, and unopened containers from retail locations. Containers of SoyNut Butter from lots #243162 and 244161 tested positive for E. coli. Whole genome sequencing revealed that the same strain of E. coli was found in clinical isolates from sick people and containers of I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter. Epidemiologic investigation determined that 32 people ill with this strain of E. coli had been infected by eating or attending a facility that served I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter. This included residents of Arizona (4), California (5), Florida (2), Illinois (1), Massachusetts (1), Maryland (1), Missouri (1), New Jersey (1), Oregon (11), Virginia (2), Washington (2), and Wisconsin (1).

The damage caused by this outbreak has been considerable. Twelve people were hospitalized due to their infection, and nine developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). HUS is a debilitating condition caused by E. coli that is commonly characterized by kidney failure, but may also lead to brain damage, seizures, and diabetes. Children less than 10 years of age are particularly at risk for developing HUS.

I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter has been recalled, but given its long shelf life, it may still be in some people’s homes. This product, therefore, may continue to pose a threat to people’s health.  Several online retailers continued to sell the recalled product at least well into August 2017.

It is not as if in 2017, contaminated nut butters should not have been an issue for manufacturers, suppliers and retailers.

In November 2006, public health officials detected a substantial increase in reports of Salmonella Tennessee isolates. In February 2007, a multistate, case-control study linked the consumption of either Peter Pan or Great Value Peanut Butter brands with infection[2]. 715 people were sickened with 129 hospitalized.  Subsequently the same strain of Salmonella Tennessee was isolated from unopened jars of peanut butter and from environmental samples collected from the processing plant. The product was recalled, and new illness reports declined. Unsanitary conditions at the Sylvester, Georgia, processing plant were known about since 2004. On April 5, 2007, ConAgra announced inadvertent moisture from a leaking roof and sprinkler system could have promoted bacteria growth in the plant. Great Value brand was sold at Walmart stores.[3]

Beginning in November 2008, CDC PulseNet staff noted a small and highly dispersed, multistate cluster of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates. The outbreak consisted of two pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) defined clusters of illness. The first cluster displayed a unique primary enzyme (XbaI) restriction pattern and an uncommon secondary enzyme (BlnI) pattern. The second cluster had two closely related XbaI patterns that were very similar to the first cluster and a BlnI pattern that was indistinguishable from the first cluster. Illnesses continued to be revealed through April 2009, when the last CDC report on the outbreak was published. A total of 714 were sickened, with 171 hospitalized and at least nine deaths. Peanut butter and peanut butter containing products produced by the Peanut Corporation of America plant in Blakely, Georgia, were implicated. King Nut brand peanut butter was sold to institutional settings. Peanut paste was sold to many food companies for use as an ingredient. Implicated peanut products were sold widely throughout the USA, 23 countries and non-U.S. territories.[4]

On September 22, 2012, the CDC announced a multistate outbreak of Salmonella serotype Bredeney linked to Trader Joe’s Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut Butter. Collaborative efforts by local, state and federal public health and regulatory officials traced the product to Sunland, Inc. a Portales, New Mexico company. Sunland issued a recall of multiple nut butters and products made with nut butters. When the outbreak was declared over, a total of 42 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella serotype Bredeney had been reported by 20 states. Among persons for whom information was available, illness onset dates ranged from June 14, 2012 to September 21, 2012. Ill persons ranged in age from less than 1 year to 79 years, with a median age of 7 years. Sixty-one percent of ill persons were children less than 10 years old. Among 36 persons with available information, 10(28%) patients had been hospitalized. The FDA confirmed that environmental samples collected at the Sunland facility had an DNA fingerprint that was indistinguishable to the DNA fingerprint found in outbreak associated patients.[5]

On August 21, 2014, the CDC announced a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Braenderup involving 6 people residing in Connecticut (1), Iowa (1), New Mexico (1), Tennessee (1), and Texas (2). Almond and peanut butter manufactured by nSpired Natural Foods, Inc. was named as the likely source of this outbreak. The outbreak was declared over on October 16, 2014. Illness onset dates range from January 22, 2014 to May 16, 2014. Among 5 ill persons with available information, one person reported being hospitalized. During inspections at the nSpired Natural Food facility in Ashland, Oregon, between January 2014 and August 2014, the FDA isolated Salmonella Braenderup from environmental samples. A search of the PulseNet database linked ill patients to the environmental isolates taken from the nSpired production plant. On August 19, 2014 nSpired Natural Foods issued a voluntary recall of certain lots of almond and peanut butters because of potential contamination with Salmonella. The recalled brands include Arrowhead Mills, MaraNatha, and specific private label almond and peanut butters.[6]

On December 2, 2015 JEM Raw Chocolate LLC (JEM Raw) of Bend, Oregon announced a recall of its full line of all nut butter spreads due to possible contamination with Salmonella. Health authorities at the FDA, Oregon Health Authority, Oregon Department of Agriculture and the CDC had linked illnesses in 13 persons who consumed nut spreads. Dates of onset ranged from July 18, 2015 to November 22, 2015. Cases were reported from California, Colorado, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Maine, North Carolina, New Jersey and Oregon.[7]

Dixie Dew and I.M. Healthly, and the entire supply chain, should have been aware of these outbreaks and taken precautions.

[1]           https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2017/o157h7-03-17/index.html

[2]           A 1996 Salmonella Mbandaka outbreak linked to peanut butter sickened at least 15 in Australia – Aust N Z J Public Health 1998 Scheil

[3]           https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5621a1.htm

[4]           https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm58e0129a1.htm

[5]           https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/bredeney-09-12/

[6]           https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/braenderup-08-14/

[7]           https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/paratyphi-b-12-15/

Food Safety News just reported that

Earlier today, Amazon.com was still selling I.M. Healthy soy nut butter that was recalled in March when federal officials traced an E. coli outbreak to the product.

No one from Seattle-based Amazon immediately responded to mid-morning requests for comment from Food Safety News, but by 11 a.m. Pacific time, the recalled peanut butter substitute had been pulled from the retailer’s website.

Officials with the Food and Drug Administration are investigating the situation, but were not able to provide details as of mid-afternoon.

Although the outbreak was declared over in May by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, that agency’s “final” report indicated additional illnesses were expected to be confirmed in relation to consumption of recalled soy nut butter products. The CDC cited the products’ long shelf life and the likelihood that some consumers still have unopened product in their homes as contributing factors to the lingering nature of the outbreak.

As of early May, the outbreak had sickened a confirmed 32 people across a dozen states. A variety of products made with soy nut butter produced by Dixie Dew Products Inc. remain under recall, including all varieties of I.M. Healthy “SoyNut Butter” products.

As of 9:45 a.m. Pacific time today, recalled I.M. Healthy brand “SoyNut Butter” was still available for purchase.

It is against federal law for anyone to sell or resell recalled products in any setting, including yard sales and thrift shops. The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, which became law in 2008, was used earlier this year by the Consumer Product Safety Commission against Home Depot. The big box home improvement retailer agreed to pay $5.7 million in relation to charges it sold recalled smoke detectors, light fixtures and other products.

The Amazon.com website does not appear to offer a list of recalled products that it has offered for sale, as do many retailers. Amazon provides a list of government recall links and a “recall policy” that includes the following statement:

“Amazon monitors public recalls alert websites and also learns of recalls directly from manufacturers and vendors. When we learn of a recall, we suspend all impacted product offerings from our website and quarantine any related inventory in our fulfillment centers. We also reach out to any customers that previously purchased impacted products (and any seller that may have offered such products) to inform them about the recall.”

Linda Harris, chair of the world renown Food Science and Technology Department at the University of California-Davis, said Monday that she ordered recalled I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter from Amazon.com during Labor Day weekend. She received the $50 shipment of three jars of the recalled product in less than 24 hours.

“The story really is about recalls and the ability in today’s world of recovering all product when you have a recall,” said Harris, who is the immediate past president of the International Association for Food Protection.

“They have sophisticated programs that set prices and figure out complicated delivery schemes – they should be able to make sure recalled product isn’t available for sale.”

Federal inmate Stewart Parnell, the former chief executive and part owner of the now defunct Peanut Corporation of America, is the featured subject of a new episode of CNBC’s “American Greed.”  The episode premieres at 10 p.m. EDT/PDT on Monday, July 3.

Stewart, 63, is serving a 28-year prison sentence for knowingly shipping peanut products contaminated with Salmonella, leading to thousands of illnesses and nine deaths in a foodborne illness outbreak that resulted in the largest food recall in U.S. history.

“American Greed” is narrated by stage, screen and television actor Stacy Keach, best known for his portrayal of detective Mike Hammer and for his Golden Globe-winning depiction of Ernest Hemingway.

Producers of the true crime series have worked for many months on the Parnell episode.    It features on-camera interviews with such food safety advocates as attorney Bill Marler, Northeastern University food policy expert Darin Detwiler, and whistleblower Kenneth Kendrick.

“American Greed” took up the story of the deadly 2008-09 outbreak that killed nine people because Parnell knew Peanut Corporation of America peanut butter and peanut paste was contaminated with Salmonella before it was shipped.

The TV series has focused on what it calls “stories from the dark side of the American Dream” to discover how far some people will go for financial wealth, “no matter the cost to themselves and those around them.” It has looked at all sorts of real-life cases. Many involve criminal activity, including credit card scams, identity theft, counterfeiting and Ponzi schemes.

Before the Salmonella outbreak was discovered in late 2008, Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) facilities in three states were managed by Parnell from a spacious residence just outside of Lynchburg, VA. When required, Parnell piloted his private plane to the state’s with company facilities.

In 2014 jury trial, Stewart Parnell was convicted on 67 federal felony counts and his brother Michael Parnell was convicted on 29. Both received prison sentences.

Three other PCA executives and managers were also convicted and sentenced to prison time.

CNBC has provided this promotional link:

Next On | American Greed: From Peanuts To Sick Millions | American GreedIt’s one of the biggest food poisoning outbreaks in U.S. history: Peanut Corporation of America CEO Stewart Parnell ships peanut products tainted with salmonella – killing nine, sickening thousands.”