The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections. This outbreak includes four different types of Salmonella: Kiambu, Thompson, Agona, and Gaminara. The same strain of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.

A total of 173 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51), Salmonella Thompson (111), Salmonella Agona (7), or Salmonella Gaminara (4) have been reported from 21 states.  Connecticut 6, Delaware 4, Iowa 2, Illinois 3, Kentucky 4, Louisiana 1, Maryland 8, Massachusetts 8, Michigan 1, Minnesota 4, Missouri 1, North Carolina 5, New Jersey 36, New York 50, Ohio 1, Oklahoma 4, Pennsylvania 8, Tennessee 1, Texas 9, Virginia 16, Wisconsin 1.  Fifty-eight ill people have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak. Three brands of Maradol papayas have been recalled: Caribeña brand, distributed by Grande Produce; certain Cavi brand papayas distributed by Agroson’s; and Valery brand papayas, distributed by Freshtex Produce, LLC. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately. The FDA has also added the Carica de Campeche farm to Import Alert (IA) 99-35, after testing found multiple strains of Salmonella present in the fruit. Thus far, Salmonella strains matching the outbreak patterns by PFGE were only isolated from papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

As of today, there are eighteen cases linked to the recent E. coli O157:H7 outbreak. Of the eighteen cases, twelve are children and six are adults. All reported illnesses are associated with playing in the water at Commodore Beach in Lake Wildwood or taking care of someone who is infected. The best method of prevention when caring for an ill person is frequent washing and drying of your hands.

There have been a total of ten hospitalizations and of those, nine have been discharged home. To date, of those with laboratory-confirmed E. coli O157:H7, the onset of symptoms has ranged from July 20-29, 2017. The Public Health Department will continue to follow up on reports of illness received from health care providers.

The five public beaches at Lake Wildwood remain closed, and the no swimming advisory remains in effect for the lake. The Environmental Health Department continues to take samples from around the lake for testing; however, the cause of the outbreak remains under investigation.

The Toledo-Lucas County Health Department released a set of statistics showing how wide the food-borne Norovirus linked to Mama C’s spread.

According to the health department, there were a total of 378 primary cases and an additional 40 secondary cases.

In all, there were people affected in 12 Ohio counties. There were also people in four additional states affected by the outbreak.

The shop reopened Monday, following a deep cleaning supervised by the health department.

The health department ruled the virus was food-borne rather than environmental.

Norovirus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis, or what we commonly think of as stomach flu symptoms. It causes 23 million cases of gastroenteritis per year, or over half of all gastroenteritis cases in the U.S., and is the second most common virus after the common cold.

Norovirus is usually transmitted from the feces to the mouth, either by drinking contaminated food or water or by passing from person to person. Because noroviruses are easily transmitted, are resistant to common disinfectants, and are hard to contain using normal sanitary measures, they can cause extended outbreaks.

The Columbian reports that Spanish Sonrise Dairy is recalling whole raw milk because it may be contaminated with E. coli.

The Yacolt dairy announced the recall on Tuesday, after routine sampling by the state Department of Agriculture found E. coli in the raw cream processed from whole raw milk, according to a news release issued by Spanish Sonrise Dairy.

The recall affects raw milk with a “best by” date of Aug. 23. The milk, which was bottled in half-gallon glass containers, was sold directly to private customers and at one retail store, Camas Produce.

E. coli infections may cause severe diarrhea, stomach cramps and bloody stool. Symptoms generally appear three to four days after exposure but can take as long as nine days to appear, according to the news release.

This isn’t the first recall for the Yacolt dairy. Spanish Sonrise issued a recall of raw milk and cream products in April 2015 after routine testing revealed listeria monocytogenes contamination. At the time of the first recall, the owners said they planned to close the dairy.

The Packer reports today that the Wisconsin Department of Health Services has linked 11 cases of salmonellosis to the consumption of fresh shelled peas from farmers markets.

A news release Aug. 11 tied seven illnesses to the peas, and another four cases have been confirmed since then.

The seven people initially reported as cases were all infected with the same strain of salmonella, and all of them had eaten fresh shelled peas that were purchased July 22 from farmers markets in Green Bay, Madison and Fond du Lac, according to the release.

Health officials are still working to determine the source of the outbreak.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has recommended that people throw away shelled peas purchased July 19-Aug. 5 at the Dane County Farmers Market in Madison, the Downtown Green Bay Farmers Market, or the Fond du Lac Farmers Market.

Not included in that notice are peas that were sold in their pod or shell or peas purchased at other farmers markets.

I’m not sure I will get through what I plan on saying today at Dave’s Memorial, so I thought I would put it here:

Funerals are painful, and our hearts go out to Jill and the entire Theno clan. We all share just a small part of your grief.

Funerals are also uncomfortable, because they remind us all of life’s fragile nature and of all the things we should have said too so many.  Especially as we grow older, we think of all the deeds that we have not done, and the ever – decreasing time to do them.

However, we are here today to honor our friend Dave, who unlike most of us, left nothing undone and leaves this life a hero.  Dave was honored by so many.  Here are just a few:

  • NSF Lifetime achievement award
  • American Association of Food Hygiene Veterinarians
  • American Meat Science Association
  • International Association of Food Protection
  • International Meat & Poultry HACCP Alliance
  • Institute of Food Technologists
  • National Advisory Committee on Meat & Poultry Inspection
  • National Advisory Committee for Microbiological Criteria for Foods
  • National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s Beef Industry Food Safety Council
  • National Meat Association
  • Black Pearl Award by the International Association of Food Protection
  • Innovator of the Year Award from Nation’s Restaurant News
  • California Environmental Health Association’s Mark Nottingham Award
  • Nation’s Restaurant News “Top 50 Players”
  • STOP’s Hero Award and Scholarship

And, this coming year Dave was due for even more deserved recognitions.

Of course, many in the food safety community’s most poignant visual, and most vivid memory, is of Dave asking a picture of Lauren what was the right thing to do.  However, Dave always knew what the right thing to do was, and Lauren was always beside him to confirm it.

In the end, Dave’s profile will not be etched into Mount Rushmore or on the Washington D.C. Mall – but it should be.  Why?  Because Dave’s life’s work saved countless lives and will continue to do so long after all of us have attended our own funerals.

Dave is and will be missed, but he will always be a hero remembered.

As of August 9, 2017, 141 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51) or Salmonella Thompson (90) have been reported from 19 states. Connecticut 5, Delaware 4, Iowa 2, Illinois 2, Kentucky 3, Louisiana 2, Maryland 8, Massachusetts 6, Michigan 1, Minnesota 4, North Carolina 3, New Jersey 27, New York 39, Ohio 1, Oklahoma 4, Pennsylvania 8, Texas 7, Virginia 14, Wisconsin 1, Total 141
Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to July 27, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 39. Among 136 ill people with available information, 83 (61%) are female. Among 98 people with available information, 66 (67%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 103 people with available information, 45 (44%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Illnesses that occurred after July 14, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

Based on information collected to date, CDC is now recommending that consumers not eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico. If consumers aren’t sure if their Maradol papaya came from the Carica de Campeche farm, they should ask the place of purchase. When in doubt, don’t eat it; just throw it out. Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

As was reported in the last update on August 4, FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella bacteria, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. CDC is working to determine if there are any illnesses with these other types of Salmonella linked to this outbreak.

The FDA is advising consumers not to eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico because they are linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis.

Three brands of Maradol papayas have been recalled: Caribeña brand, distributed by Grande Produce; certain Cavi brand papayas distributed by Agroson’s; and Valery brand papayas, distributed by Freshtex Produce, LLC. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately.

Recent Op-ed in the Hill on Import Risks:

http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/energy-environment/343444-why-the-us-imports-tainted-food-that-can-kill-you

Fourteen children and adults have been diagnosed with E. coli after spending time at a Lake Wildwood beach in Nevada County, according to the county’s public health department.

Of the 14 cases, 11 children and three adults were infected at Commodor Beach. .

In addition, four children developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is a potentially life-threatening condition with anemia and kidney complications, health department officials said.

Commodor Beach as well as four other public beaches at Lake Wildwood were shut down on July 28, five days after the last known date of exposure to E. coli.

Prior to that, the Nevada County Health Department issued an advisory for people swimming at the lake after five people reportedly contracted E. coli from the beach area.

All public beaches will remain closed until contamination levels in the lake water have dropped to a safe level and until three E. coli incubation periods have passed since the last known case of exposure.

The Environmental Health Department continues to test the water at Lake Wildwood twice a week at eight different points near Commodore, Meadow Park and Hideaway Park beaches.

Results from Monday’s samples warrant continued beach closures after results at seven of the sites near the three beaches indicated elevated levels of fecal coliforms, with the highest levels being measures at Meadow Park, according to health officials.

A sources for the contamination has not been determined, but officials have already tested the wastewater system and the canals along Deer Creek. There is additional testing of wildlife feces, sand and other tributary points in order to determine the origin of the bacteria.

The CDC reports today that the outbreak investigation has expanded to include another strain of Salmonella.

Sixty-four more ill people from 15 states were added to this investigation since the last update on July 21, 2017.

Six more states have reported ill people: Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Laboratory tests showed that the strain of Salmonella Thompson isolated from papayas collected in Maryland is closely related genetically to clinical isolates from ill people.

FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and found they were contaminated with several types of Salmonella.

A total of 109 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (48) or Salmonella Thompson (61) have been reported from 16 states – Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Thirty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas imported from Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

At this time, Caribeña brand papayas from Mexico have been identified as one brand linked to the outbreak. On July 26, Grande Produce recalled Caribeña brand Maradol papayas that were distributed between July 10 and July 19, 2017.

Through testing, the FDA has also identified Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche papaya farm in Mexico as a likely source of the outbreak. The agency is working to identify other brands of papayas that may have originated from Carica de Campeche and facilitate recalls.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from Mexico.

Elkhorn Logan Valley Public Health Department and Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services continue to investigate an outbreak of salmonella in West Point. To date, there have been 20 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases. ELVPHD and DHHS are working to identify the source of the outbreak and make sure the risk is eliminated.

Local health department officials and DHHS are conducting interviews with Nebraskans who contracted the illness. So far, all confirmed cases have one common factor which is dining at Red Door Coffee in West Point. Red Door Coffee owners and staff are fully cooperating with the investigation.

Anyone who ate at Red Door Coffee July 14 – July 29 is asked to complete a brief survey that will help ELVPHD and DHHS in this investigation. The survey may be found at:  https://han.ne.gov/survey/rdc.

Salmonella is caused by a bacteria that lives in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals. It is usually spread to humans by eating contaminated food, including beef, poultry, milk, eggs, fruits or vegetables.

Symptoms of salmonella include fever, diarrhea and stomach cramps. The illness usually lasts 4-7 days. Most people recover without treatment. However, in some cases the diarrhea may be so severe that a person needs to be hospitalized. People at highest risk for salmonella infection include: children under 5 years old, older adults and people with weakened immune systems. Anyone experiencing symptoms consistent with salmonella should contact their doctor for recommendations on testing and treatment.